Good vegetables

Faye and I subscribe to our local organic gardeners’ biweekly winter vegetable box program. I picked up our box today and was greeted by the resident kitty. Our box contained a couple onions, a bag each of carrots, potatoes, and beets, as well as a bag of spinach and a bunch of kale.

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We almost certainly pay more for our vegetables that we might at the grocery store. Yet we know where they come from, how fresh they are, and we support a local business. While cost is important when sourcing products and services; quality, service, and local sourcing are also important. For example, we might find some things – say, spinach or kale – less costly if we shopped at Costco or at Wal Mart. Yet we’d have to drive an hour one way to Costco,. Even 20 minutes’ drive to Wal Mart is not worth it. With the winter box, quality, service, and local sourcing won out over cost. We will likely do this again next winter.

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Comment, February 19

This is the first in an occasional series of posts that don’t fit on my main page. I’ll post about a variety of topics as the mood and need strikes me.
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I’m very grateful to live in this small town.

While our town lacks some services, almost all of our basic needs are met here in town and within a reasonable walk from home. It’s a 20 minute walk (often far less) to:

The grocery store;
The hardware store (for small things that we don’t need a car to carry);
Sit down restautants;
Tim Horton’s;
The library (we love the library!);
the post office (no home delivery – all mail goes to a box);
the municipal centre for renewing dog and vehicle licences;
the dentist;
the doctor (only if we can get off the wait list);
the LCBO;
the attorney;
an ice cream shop;
two hair cutters;
an informal off-leash area to let the dogs run.

I suspect that our list of walkable errands is much more comprehensive than what most folks can describe. I’m grateful that we can accomplish so many errands with a walk or a bike, instead of being compelled to drive to accomplish the most basic tasks – like get a bag of milk. While we can drive (and probably drive more than we should) these errands, driving is optional. We don’t NEED to drive and having that option may become more important as we age, and as gasoline becomes more costly (which I believe is inevitable).

I’m not anti car. I like driving. I dislike having no reasonable option or even any option at all, to drive to fulfill basic life errands. It’s good to be able to choose – do I walk to renew the dogs’ licences, or do I drive?

Can you walk errands? Is there a place where you can meet and greet neighbours? Do you have or operate such a place?